food

created 2 years ago

The sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and promote saturated fat as the culprit instead, newly released historical documents show.
The documents show that a trade group called the Sugar Research Foundation, known today as the Sugar Association, paid three Harvard scientists the equivalent of about $50,000 in today’s dollars to publish a 1967 review of research on sugar, fat and heart disease.
The Harvard scientists and the sugar executives with whom they collaborated are no longer alive. One of the scientists who was paid by the sugar industry was D. Mark Hegsted, who went on to become the head of nutrition at the United States Department of Agriculture, where in 1977 he helped draft the forerunner to the federal government’s dietary guidelines. Another was Dr. Fredrick J. Stare, the chairman of Harvard’s nutrition department.
mobile.nytimes.com
What matters is the matching of a specific person's DNA with specific foods—something called nutrigenomics.
With machine learning and detailed data, it should be possible to combine DNA testing and quantified self-tracking to understand dietary needs and apply this to the "Internet of Food" to satisfy those needs. (I define the Internet of Food as a large-scale effort to enable all known information about every food ingredient and product to be accessible by machines, consumers, and companies.)
Riemann told me that Shae uses artificial intelligence to learn your preferences and habits. For example, Shae "cross-correlates what you like [to eat] vs. what's good for you."
www.fastcompany.com
The modern sandwich is named after Lord Sandwich, but the exact circumstances of its invention and original use are still the subject of debate. A rumour in a contemporaneous travel book called Tour to London by Pierre-Jean Grosley formed the popular myth that bread and meat sustained Lord Sandwich at the gambling table.[21] Lord Sandwich was a very conversant gambler, the story goes, and he did not take the time to have a meal during his long hours playing at the card table. Consequently, he would ask his servants to bring him slices of meat between two slices of bread, a habit well known among his gambling friends. Other people, according to this account, began to order "the same as Sandwich!", and thus the "sandwich" was born.
en.wikipedia.org
“It has recently come to our attention that a small number of our customers have experienced gastrointestinal issues after consuming Soylent Bars,” the company said. “As a precautionary measure, we are halting all Soylent Bar purchases and shipments and are advising our customers to discard any remaining bars in their possession.”
news.vice.com
FIRST BREAKTHROUGH on this idea was with salt. It’s the most basic ingredient, but it can also be hellishly complex. A chef can go crazy figuring out how much salt to add to a dish. But I believe there is an objectively correct amount of salt, and it is rooted in a counterintuitive idea. Normally we think of a balanced dish as being neither too salty nor undersalted. I think that’s wrong. When a dish is perfectly seasoned, it will taste simultaneously like it has too much salt and too little salt. It is fully committed to being both at the same time.
Most people won’t ever notice this sensation; they’ll just appreciate that the food tastes good. But under the surface, the saltiness paradox has a very powerful effect, because it makes you very aware of what you’re eating and your own reaction to it. It nags at you, and it keeps you in the moment, thinking about what you’re tasting. And that’s what makes it delicious.
Miso is made by fermenting soybeans, but I wanted to see what happens when you ferment nuts, seeds, and other legumes. It turns out you can get some really delicious flavors. I particularly loved the flavor I was able to get from fermenting chickpeas. I called the result a chickpea hozon, a word I invented because it wasn’t technically miso.
When you eat something amazing, you don’t just respond to the dish in front of you; you are almost always transported back to another moment in your life. It’s like that scene in Ratatouille when the critic eats a fancy version of the titular dish and gets whisked back to the elemental version of his childhood.
I had this experience not long ago when I ate a fisherman’s stew at Bar Tartine in San Francisco. I was expecting it to taste like cioppino, the classic tomato-based Bay Area delicacy (which I personally hate). But it turned out to be so much better.
Europeans like sauerkraut—but kimchi is this weird foreign entity. They’re both salty, rotten cabbage! It shows you just how shallow human nature is, for someone to say, oh I’ll eat this but I’d never eat that. That’s the dumbest thing in the world.
www.wired.com
This is a very tasty way to make wings. You can dip them in your favorite sauce when baked or they are yummy as-is.
www.food.com
The coffee franchise is now looking to win the hearts of the brunch crowd by creating a new weekend breakfast menu with baked French toast, quiche, and belgian waffles.
The menu premiered in 78 Seattle and Portland-based stores on September 3rd, only opening up the menu at these locations on Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to noon. Some of the food items, like the waffles and the quiches, have been available previously at other locations but were eventually pulled. Last year, the company also attempted to debut a brunch menu at its northwest shops but it never developed further. Starbucks also has a Sunset menu that it debuted this summer nationwide, which had special items like Granitas and trifles that were only available after 3 p.m.
www.psfk.com
“FiDi was a natural choice because our food is quick, fresh, and healthy. For people that eat lunch out several times a week, they can come to Sababa and have a real meal, with vibrant flavors and seasonings, but within their lunch hour and budget.“
“Sababa is a Hebrew and Arabic slang word meaning to have a good time - and really that’s how I describe what we try to do at Sababa.”
“I’ve always wanted to open my own restaurant, but always thought it would be later in my life, after years of fine dining training. Instead, I came to the conclusion that I like cooking casual, tasty food, especially my childhood cuisine from Israel. At the age of 23, instead of finishing up a business degree while working in fine dining, I decided to take the plunge and pursue Sababa seriously.“
“I’ve probably changed the recipe (for the falafel) 10 times before I was happy with it. That being said, I highly recommend trying a sabik sandwich. It’s something uniquely Israeli. It comes from Iraqi jews that came to Israel, and it’s now one of the most popular sandwiches in Israel.”
www.bobcutmag.com
The observational study was presented at the European Society of Cardiology conference this weekend. It showed that the people who have had a history of cardiovascular disease and stuck closest to the diet had a 37% lower risk of death compared with those who didn't stick with it.
Earlier studies showed that people eating the Mediterranean diet have a lower risk of heart attack and stroke. It may lower your risk of cancer, improve your bone health and help you live longer generally.
www.cnn.com
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